ceramic wax

ttocs

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Now that I think I can actually get it out of the garage safely I have been thinking about the paint. I keep seeing detailing places advertising ceramic wax protection for INSANE prices and wondering if they are that good or that labor intensive to put on? I use to isntall audio/security out of a automotive detailing shop and they did an amazing job on the car for $400 back in the day so when I see places getting $1-2k for these ceramic jobs I have to wonder if its just some fancy cool-aid people are drinking? I hear its nice and it better be for that price and come with a hummer from a hot model as well as far as I am concerned... Has anyone tried any? Has anyone found any they liked or disliked? I have a few different waxes that I have always been happy with and just not sure I need to spend that much more
 

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Had my '96 done by a detail shop about a year ago. Extremely happy with the results. That said, this is an original paint car, and it needed a fair amount of paint correction to get to this point. Other than a few stone-chip touch ups and such, the paint looks better than new. Very deep shine, no swirl marks, high gloss and easy to clean.

IIRC, you car was recently painted. I am not sure I buy into the wild claims some of these companies are making about the durability of the finish - I don't think you can abuse it the way some people claim and still have it look great. It lasts longer than wax, for sure.
 

Bronco2Fan

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I've had all mine done, except the Jeep. My son does this so I can say it really does make a difference in appearance. And yes it is time consuming if done correctly. Paint correction is the most time used. Even new paint jobs have swirl marks and contaminants in the paint. My S550 when new had them and I didn't let the dealership touch it, ie Prep for delivery. Most people think after it's coated that it's fully protected, not true. Birds and weather can affect it. Plus it should be boosted at least every 6 months, especially if you keep them outside.

He just finished a Jag that was deep blue with flake and it looks brand new. He had it for 2 days. Plus he gets vehicles from the body shops after they're painted to remove the swirls and any overspray. So I say if you can afford it, do it. If not you can always buy the DA Buffers, assorted pads, Clay bars, polishes, and Ceramic products and learn. It's just time consuming for sure.
 
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ttocs

ttocs

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I've had all mine done, except the Jeep. My son does this so I can say it really does make a difference in appearance. And yes it is time consuming if done correctly. Paint correction is the most time used. Even new paint jobs have swirl marks and contaminants in the paint. My S550 when new had them and I didn't let the dealership touch it, ie Prep for delivery. Most people think after it's coated that it's fully protected, not true. Birds and weather can affect it. Plus it should be boosted at least every 6 months, especially if you keep them outside.

He just finished a Jag that was deep blue with flake and it looks brand new. He had it for 2 days. Plus he gets vehicles from the body shops after they're painted to remove the swirls and any overspray. So I say if you can afford it, do it. If not you can always buy the DA Buffers, assorted pads, Clay bars, polishes, and Ceramic products and learn. It's just time consuming for sure.
Just curious what the price for entry was and then the 6 month booster? Paint correction is COMPLETELY different from a nice wax job. I have polishes, glazes and a DA to work them and it is a fair amount of work but is there anything more to the ceramic wax than wax on/wax off?
 

Bronco2Fan

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Ceramic wax is an oxy moron, they make you think it's ceramic but not. Ceramic coating is a clear coating that bonds to the paint. That's why the surface has to be prepped. There can't be anything between the paint and ceramic coat. It's applied differently than any wax, polish or glaze. Those products contain the SI02 chemical which repels water and enhances shine.

This is the product my son uses. He doesn't apply any wax or polish after coating because the product needs to flash.
 
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ttocs

ttocs

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any good detailing/wax job starts by stripping off the old wax/products but its not like that is a 8 hour process. I assume its much more labor intensive than wax on/off?
 

Bronco2Fan

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The majority of the work is paint correction and prep. As you know swirls and scratches have to be removed and that is a process all by itself. You have to start as light as possible and work from there, panel by panel. If you start off to coarse you're just making more work for yourself, to light and it doesn't remove the imperfections.

So yes, it's more than wax on, wax off. Good car wash (no additives) ie, no wash and wax products, clay bar the panels, (top to bottom), paint correction as needed ( time consuming ). Then remove all the product you used for paint correction, ( because there can't be anything between the paint and ceramic coating ). He uses some wax removing product, I don't recall which one. Then you can coat the panels with ceramic.
 

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