Engine swap planning - analysis paralysis

FullstackViking

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I have pushed off retiring my tired NPI 2v for years now. And just want to throw my thoughts into the void to see if anybody can push me in any meaninful direction.

My power goal is to be as fast/faster than current gen muscle cars. This car will likely never see the track, so I want good street manners as well. I also do care about the pedigree of the Modular motor. I think its a flawed motor limited by displacement, but as a period piece it represents an interesting time for Ford. I also think its the best sounding V8 barring some exotics or race cars.

Builds I've considered:
TFS 2v top end swap - Teksid/WAP block
Pros:
- Cheaper than 4v
- Lighter/less moving parts than 4v
- Most plug-and-play with my 96 GT
- Twin screw options

Cons:
- Ceiling of 2v N/A power
- 2v platform does not have the racing pedigree of a 4v
- Will not hit power goals without FI

Mark VIII 4V Swap
Pros:
- Cheaper than C headed swap
- SVT/4v pedigree

Cons:
- Limited aftermarket
- Additional swap work

Notes:
Only 1 twin screw supercharger option (KB 96-98 cobra)

Lincoln Aviator Swap
Pros:
- 4v/SVT pedigree
- Best 4v aftermarket support
- Best mass market modular cylinder heads

Cons:
- Price
- Additional swap work

Notes:
Aftermarket twin screw options require 03/04 cobra timing cover, manifold, plumbing.

3V Mustang Swap
Pros:
- Price
- Better aftermarket than 2/4v
- Twin screw options

Cons:
- Red-headed step child of Ford
- Hood clearance (?)
- Additional swap work

F150 Coyote Swap
Pros:
- Coyote design > modular motor
- Great aftermarket support
- Preferred firing order over Mustang Coyote
- Cheaper than Mustang coyote

Cons:
- Price
- High level of swap effort
- T45 transmission will need to be swapped

Mustang Coyote Swap
Pros:
- Coyote design > modular motor
- Great aftermarket support
- Out of the box power, zero modification

Cons:
- Firing order sounds worse
- PRICE
- High level of swap effort
- T45 will need to be swapped

L92/LS3/LS2 Swap
Pros:
- Massive N/A power potential
- Massive aftermarket support
- Mod affordability

Cons:
- Blasphemous
- Lacks modular firing order/sound
- High level of swap effort

So anyway - a bit of a rant. But I'd really like to stick N/A or with a Twin Screw supercharger. I am mechanically inclined, but if I'm being honest with myself, the easier the swap is, the less likely its going to sit on jack stands for months/years. The firing order/sound matters a lot to me, which is why I don't want to go the budget turbo route either.

If anybody has gone through this thought process or disagrees with any points I have I'd appreciate any feedback!
 
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lwarrior1016

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I went up and down this road as well. Built a high compression, big cam 2v, it sounded great and ran well, but they are not power houses and will never keep up with today’s cars.

I settled on a coyote swap for the out of box power and the potential for more power. The biggest issue is finding an exhaust that sounds good with the coyote. I settled on long tubes, 3” h pipe, and hooker max flow mufflers. The sound is just right, but does not have the classic sound.
 

07GtS197

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Why would you have to swap your t45 with a coyote? Also it’s not the firing order that’s better, the mustang coyote has better cams and more compression. Coyote swaps are pretty popular but will require a lot of work. What’s your budget? A 4v with a blower might be the easiest swap.
 

RAU03MACH

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I'm kinds in the middle of doing the same thing
I am building a 4.6 DOHC for my 98gt
With automatic transmission
Wanting a little more power
 
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FullstackViking

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I went up and down this road as well. Built a high compression, big cam 2v, it sounded great and ran well, but they are not power houses and will never keep up with today’s cars.

I settled on a coyote swap for the out of box power and the potential for more power. The biggest issue is finding an exhaust that sounds good with the coyote. I settled on long tubes, 3” h pipe, and hooker max flow mufflers. The sound is just right, but does not have the classic sound.
That's how I think I would be as well if I went the TFS route and I didn't put a blower on it. How much do you think you spent on your Coyote swap? Do you still have the functionality of all your interior controls/gauges?

Why would you have to swap your t45 with a coyote? Also it’s not the firing order that’s better, the mustang coyote has better cams and more compression. Coyote swaps are pretty popular but will require a lot of work. What’s your budget? A 4v with a blower might be the easiest swap.
I would at least want to rebuild my T45 then because I know mine won't shift anywhere sniffing 7000rpm. The firing order of the F150 coyotes and the Mustang coyotes are not the same. The F150 Coyote has the modular firing order, but the Mustang one was changed. That's why you can't use the Ford Coyote Control Pack with them unless you make moditications to the harness or convert the F150 motor to use mustang cams. But yes there are lots of mechanical differences too like you mentioned. The firing orders are a large part of why they sound slightly different though.

No budget really, but it would have to be probably under $12k everything said and done since I can get a Terminator/GT500 dropout for around that.

I'm kinds in the middle of doing the same thing
I am building a 4.6 DOHC for my 98gt
What engine are you starting with?
 

lwarrior1016

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I really don’t know how much was spent on it, but I did it as cheap as possible out the gate and have been upgrading as time and money allowed.

Engine- $1300
Holley efi-$2400
Mechanical Throttle body-$250
Throttle cable- $100
Homemade/adapted 2v long tube headers and exhaust.


I did my swap with a gen 1 f150 engine. They are the same firing order as the mustang. The gen 2 f150 had the different firing order.

I already had manual steering and brakes so the coyote kept its accessories in stock location.
 
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FullstackViking

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I really don’t know how much was spent on it, but I did it as cheap as possible out the gate and have been upgrading as time and money allowed.

Engine- $1300
Holley efi-$2400
Mechanical Throttle body-$250
Throttle cable- $100
Homemade/adapted 2v long tube headers and exhaust.


I did my swap with a gen 1 f150 engine. They are the same firing order as the mustang. The gen 2 f150 had the different firing order.

I already had manual steering and brakes so the coyote kept its accessories in stock location.
Yeah all the Gen 2 stuff within 4 hours drive of me is going for $3000+ unfortunately. Did you go with aftermarket gauges too? Or were you able to retrofit your existing ones?
 

lwarrior1016

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Yeah all the Gen 2 stuff within 4 hours drive of me is going for $3000+ unfortunately. Did you go with aftermarket gauges too? Or were you able to retrofit your existing ones?
I ordered the engine on eBay lol. I was already running all autometer gauges because my 2v had been running on megasquirt before the swap.
 

96blak54

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The down fall of the t45 is its shifting forks and linkage components. Im not sure if the supporting companies are still in operation, but once the common issues are upgraded its a bullet proof transmission.
 
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FullstackViking

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The down fall of the t45 is its shifting forks and linkage components. Im not sure if the supporting companies are still in operation, but once the common issues are upgraded its a bullet proof transmission.

Mine definitely need replacing because I can barely even shift quickly from 1-2 with the NPI pushing it lol
 

lwarrior1016

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The down fall of the t45 is its shifting forks and linkage components. Im not sure if the supporting companies are still in operation, but once the common issues are upgraded its a bullet proof transmission.
Stan at Pro-Force Performance is Georgia is the one to talk to. He’s got all the goodies, and is more than willing to share knowledge
 

96blak54

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Mine definitely need replacing because I can barely even shift quickly from 1-2 with the NPI pushing it lol
The early t45 came with paper type syncos and are known to give up under racing conditions. Ford eventually switched to a carbon type syncro shortly after. I will admit the newer 3650(?) Is a better trans out of the box.
 
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FullstackViking

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The early t45 came with paper type syncos and are known to give up under racing conditions. Ford eventually switched to a carbon type syncro shortly after. I will admit the newer 3650(?) Is a better trans out of the box.
If a built 3650 is $2500 without core, wouldn't it just be better to step up to a T56 anyway though?
 

07GtS197

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Keep in mind the t56 has gear ratios better suited for boost. I’d only go that route if I had a blower and needed to hold a lot of power. Otherwise, a built t45 or tr3650 would be my choice.
 
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FullstackViking

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Keep in mind the t56 has gear ratios better suited for boost. I’d only go that route if I had a blower and needed to hold a lot of power. Otherwise, a built t45 or tr3650 would be my choice.
They sell a close-ratio T56 Magnum and I have a 3.73 rear end as well, so it gets a little muddy lol
 

07GtS197

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If you’re going with a centri blower you’ll want more gear with the 2.66 first gear. Even the 2.97 first gear version I’d still recommend 4.10s minimum.
 
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FullstackViking

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If you’re going with a centri blower you’ll want more gear with the 2.66 first gear. Even the 2.97 first gear version I’d still recommend 4.10s minimum.
I'm not opposed to centrifrugal blower, but I've never heard one in person that doesn't whistle at idle or low throttle. And this car has to pass the wife test lol
 

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