This should be fun…

J_lope82

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I use the Harbor freight engine support as well. Works great

I use their giant 3 ton jack stands for trucks and at the lowest setting its almost high enough to roll a transmission out from under it on a trans jack. Overkill. But it works and I feel pretty good about it.
I needed to replace an oil pan gasket. I borrowed an engine hoist from a buddy of mine. Just got done a few minutes ago.
 

cobrajeff96

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Mmmm, nah. I don't use forks or hammers or anything on a spindle even if MM recommends something. I always use a Pitman Arm Puller and this is THE best way. Respect to MM of course, but I'll go my own route.
 

NXcoupe

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If it was an aluminum spindle, you'd be correct. In your opinion, it's the best way, in my opinion, I'll have both sides disassembled and going back together by the time you get your tool set up and one apart. It does no damage, if it did, your front end would come apart after hitting a big pot hole. I guess it's the difference between doing it for a living and doing it as a hobby.
And maybe it's me, but your reply seemed a little smug and condescending, but again, maybe that's just me.
That's what's great about this hobby, there are many ways to get to the same end result. It's a preference in methodology.
 

cobrajeff96

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Agree to disagree, I suppose. To setup a puller would take me only a minute. Coupled with zero risk to any part, especially the threaded stud, is the reason I prefer this method. Not sure if you've ever dealt with a seized up set of components, but if you do and it's particularly trying, give the two-jaw puller a try. It might save you a lot of grief. If you discerned offensive nature from one of my posting, I'm not sure what to say other than no offense was intended.
 
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Cochise

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Oil pan gasket installation instructions…. Annnnd go!

My brother (he’s a big block Chevy guy) told me to put silicon on the curves of the gasket. He said after I lay it on the oil pan, apply the silicon, then installed oil pan with gasket.

Is this really necessary?
 

weendoggy

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Oil pan gasket installation instructions…. Annnnd go!

My brother (he’s a big block Chevy guy) told me to put silicon on the curves of the gasket. He said after I lay it on the oil pan, apply the silicon, then installed oil pan with gasket.

Is this really necessary?
The 4.6 is a flat pan gasket and doesn't have the "curves" of the gasket like the old Chevy's. First, make sure the surface of both block and pan are clean and dry (brakleen). I do use a tack type adhesive (lightly) to hold the gasket in place on the pan, but I do use a dab of silicone on each seam of the front and rear cover areas. That's four spots. I then let it sit there for about 5min. before setting the pan in place and tightening down. After that, walk away for the day to let it all setup. I don't even put oil in it until the following day.
 

J_lope82

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Damn I just did the oil pan last weekend. My only concern was to get the pan back under the engine. I Just made sure all the surfaces were clean but didn’t add any silicone.
 

RAU03MACH

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well i made that mistake once, leaked everywhere i had to pull the motor and silicone the pan
 

J_lope82

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well i made that mistake once, leaked everywhere i had to pull the motor and silicone the pan
Yikes I hope I don’t have to do that. The gasket for my engine is designed to be self sealant and shouldn’t need silicone.
 
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Cochise

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The 4.6 is a flat pan gasket and doesn't have the "curves" of the gasket like the old Chevy's. First, make sure the surface of both block and pan are clean and dry (brakleen). I do use a tack type adhesive (lightly) to hold the gasket in place on the pan, but I do use a dab of silicone on each seam of the front and rear cover areas. That's four spots. I then let it sit there for about 5min. before setting the pan in place and tightening down. After that, walk away for the day to let it all setup. I don't even put oil in it until the following day.
Can you point to the 4 spots where you recommend putting silicon? I’m not sure I understand.
 

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lwarrior1016

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It’s going to be roughly these areas, but you’re going to put the silicone on the engine itself. If you look at the sealing surface of the bottom of the engine, you will see there are 4 split lines. Two in front where the timing cover meets the block and two in the rear where the rear cover meets the block. It doesn’t take much silicone, it is just enough to fill the seams. B5D5C5CC-0B4D-4616-82D5-FEA8AB8592BA.jpeg
 
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Cochise

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It’s going to be roughly these areas, but you’re going to put the silicone on the engine itself. If you look at the sealing surface of the bottom of the engine, you will see there are 4 split lines. Two in front where the timing cover meets the block and two in the rear where the rear cover meets the block. It doesn’t take much silicone, it is just enough to fill the seams. View attachment 21969
Thanks!!!
 

RAU03MACH

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i know when i bought the high dollar gasket and new oil pan , i was told you dont need silicone
so i put the pan and gasket in , fire up the car its pissing oil , tighten the bolts up more it got worse
now iv got the Exxon Valdez happening
i pulled the engine again and put silicone both sides of the gasket
i ended up using the right stuff and my leaks are gone
that happened on my cobra not once twice

learned that lesson use silicone
 

badass98svt

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Yup silicon on the 4 front and back where the covers touch the block. The same thing if you were attaching the intake to the block as well.
 

Snorky

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I put the rtv black on the seams between the timing cover and block, and rearain seal plate and the block. Let it tack for 5 or so minutes, put the gasket on the pan. Get a single bolt started a few threads. Then get several more started a few threads and work them all in to "finger tight" let it sit for another 10 min. And then torque to spec.
 

weendoggy

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...and while you're at it (provided you didn't install it yet) make sure the pan is flat. The gasket is pretty forgiving on small "dents".
 
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Cochise

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I put the rtv black on the seams between the timing cover and block, and rearain seal plate and the block. Let it tack for 5 or so minutes, put the gasket on the pan. Get a single bolt started a few threads. Then get several more started a few threads and work them all in to "finger tight" let it sit for another 10 min. And then torque to spec.
I haven't looked it up yet but do you happen to know tq specs? If not I'll search for it later today.
 

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