White95's Autocross thread

ttocs

Post Whore
Joined
Oct 9, 2009
Messages
29,859
Reaction score
4,581
Location
Evansville Indiana
sounds like ya had a good time for sure. We need to make you a little sticker for the front "Insert cone here >"
 
OP
OP
white95

white95

Apex Junky
Admin
Joined
Dec 30, 2007
Messages
18,676
Reaction score
5,660
Location
Prairieville, LA
My fourth run, LOL! Fell asleep after lunch apparently and pretty much went for a leisurely cruise through the cones. Lost time everywhere. (27/26 cold)

D6003F6E-C4C1-4DA2-9A6E-A4E3CDA30EF1.png

For my fifth run I picked up the pace again and nearly put it in the grass on the back straight leading to the final slalom. Struggled with that brake zone and off/on throttle transition leading to the finish line. (28/27 hot)


4106E2A7-CA83-440A-A43B-33948F322168.png

My sixth run was the best of my clean passes. Finally found a decent rhythm but it was to late in the day! Needed to be there much earlier but I’m happy! The car did well and can only improve from here. The rear tires are about shot and I have to begin thinking about replacing them. (27/27 hot)


361E9116-7948-4F28-AD29-7A3FE2DF00FB.png
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
white95

white95

Apex Junky
Admin
Joined
Dec 30, 2007
Messages
18,676
Reaction score
5,660
Location
Prairieville, LA
Found myself part throttle too much and anything other than smooth throttle application equates to instant oversteer. Rear wheel drive is fun with cheap tires! I’m not going to make many changes to the car ahead of the next event but I will install the Wilwood brake bias adjuster. The pads are also suspect and don’t feel good until they heat up. I’m going to research that some.
 
Joined
Apr 3, 2019
Messages
212
Reaction score
183
It's great to see the car back out on course. Thanks for posting the update and the videos. As always, it's tough to give advice about a course I didn't drive, but I noticed a few things on your sixth run...

You mentioned being at part throttle too much. It did look/sound like there was a lot of time at part throttle or even off throttle. The large sweeper in the center of the course (the cones on the perimeter of what looks like a chalk square) is an element where you could have increased your duration of acceleration and smoothed out your throttle inputs. It looks like you were driving cone-to-cone through that section, as opposed to thinking of it as one large sweeper. Steady-state throttle through most of that section might have helped you find some time. If that wasn't possible, I think you could have stayed on the gas longer before lifting a little to help the car turn around each cone.

Going sideways in the middle of the run cost you some time. Your aggression level coming out of elements is good; it's just a slight input timing issue (especially if your tires are bald).

I think you could have been faster into, through and out of the last slalom before the finish. That element looked pretty attackable from the video.

All in all, you did a great job of getting faster on the runs! At your next event, focus on linking elements and sections together & bringing your throttle and braking inputs closer together.
 
OP
OP
white95

white95

Apex Junky
Admin
Joined
Dec 30, 2007
Messages
18,676
Reaction score
5,660
Location
Prairieville, LA
It's great to see the car back out on course. Thanks for posting the update and the videos. As always, it's tough to give advice about a course I didn't drive, but I noticed a few things on your sixth run...

Great to be back! I just posted a few in car videos and you can see how much more confidence I have in the steering! Things are starting to come together.
You mentioned being at part throttle too much. It did look/sound like there was a lot of time at part throttle or even off throttle. The large sweeper in the center of the course (the cones on the perimeter of what looks like a chalk square) is an element where you could have increased your duration of acceleration and smoothed out your throttle inputs. It looks like you were driving cone-to-cone through that section, as opposed to thinking of it as one large sweeper. Steady-state throttle through most of that section might have helped you find some time. If that wasn't possible, I think you could have stayed on the gas longer before lifting a little to help the car turn around each cone.

Alright, I feel need to brush up on some “driving cone to cone prevention”. Does this mean that I’m turning a broad arc into a more “segmented” or by making too many unnecessary steering inputs? I know I was trying to “enter wide and finish tight”.

Going sideways in the middle of the run cost you some time. Your aggression level coming out of elements is good; it's just a slight input timing issue (especially if your tires are bald).

It was a lot of fun but my instincts to stop a spin override trying to ride it out and keep forward momentum.

I think you could have been faster into, through and out of the last slalom before the finish. That element looked pretty attackable from the video.

That was all mental. I’m still getting used to having actual steering that responds to my inputs. I recall feeling I was carrying too much speed and probably wasn’t enough. Seat time needed!

All in all, you did a great job of getting faster on the runs! At your next event, focus on linking elements and sections together & bringing your throttle and braking inputs closer together.

Thank you for the encouragement and I’ll be back with more!
 
Joined
Apr 3, 2019
Messages
212
Reaction score
183
Alright, I feel need to brush up on some “driving cone to cone prevention”. Does this mean that I’m turning a broad arc into a more “segmented” or by making too many unnecessary steering inputs? I know I was trying to “enter wide and finish tight”.
It's hard to be 100% sure from the video, but it does look like you were driving the arc in segments (0:27-0:36). You would let off of the gas well ahead of the cones, then add steering input to get around the cones. By looking at it as 1 large arc (a sweeper), you can set your speed as you enter the sweeper, then hold that speed through the sweeper (until making a speed adjustment as necessary for the element after the sweeper). Your entry can still help your exit; it's what happens in-between that can cost you time. Smooth out the arc; smooth out the throttle inputs; keep the car right at the limit of traction; run a line that doesn't add distance or choke off speed.
It was a lot of fun but my instincts to stop a spin override trying to ride it out and keep forward momentum.
By input timing, I mean that waiting a little longer to get on the throttle would have prevented going sideways. Overlapping inputs (throttle and steering) can lead to the rear end kicking out. That wasn't a big moment, but your instinct not to ride out going sideways is correct. Trying to save a big loss of traction generally leads to a bigger loss of traction (which isn't a good thing).
That was all mental. I’m still getting used to having actual steering that responds to my inputs. I recall feeling I was carrying too much speed and probably wasn’t enough. Seat time needed!
Watching the videos of your steering inputs, your hand position looks really good. And you keep your hands on the wheel (also good). Again, it's tough to be 100% sure from a video, but I think you'll be able to speed up your hands as you get used to the improved steering response.

In that last slalom, you were off of the gas around the 2nd cone. I think you could have gotten on the gas at that 2nd cone and powered through the finish. Being early on the 1st cone would have allowed you to be faster in; getting on the throttle early would have made you faster through and out.

You've got very good fundamentals and instincts. The next step is to build up your trust in them to attack longer sections of the course. Part of it is going faster into & through elements, but the harder thing to do is to link elements together to hold your speed for a longer amount of time. Accomplishing that requires a combination of identifying sections (not just individual elements) on your course walks and looking further ahead on your runs.

I'm looking forward to seeing videos from your next event!
 
OP
OP
white95

white95

Apex Junky
Admin
Joined
Dec 30, 2007
Messages
18,676
Reaction score
5,660
Location
Prairieville, LA
It's hard to be 100% sure from the video, but it does look like you were driving the arc in segments (0:27-0:36). You would let off of the gas well ahead of the cones, then add steering input to get around the cones. By looking at it as 1 large arc (a sweeper), you can set your speed as you enter the sweeper, then hold that speed through the sweeper (until making a speed adjustment as necessary for the element after the sweeper). Your entry can still help your exit; it's what happens in-between that can cost you time. Smooth out the arc; smooth out the throttle inputs; keep the car right at the limit of traction; run a line that doesn't add distance or choke off speed.

Thank you. I’ll definitely be applying this on course.

By input timing, I mean that waiting a little longer to get on the throttle would have prevented going sideways. Overlapping inputs (throttle and steering) can lead to the rear end kicking out. That wasn't a big moment, but your instinct not to ride out going sideways is correct. Trying to save a big loss of traction generally leads to a bigger loss of traction (which isn't a good thing).

I get what you’re saying. Basically letting the car settle a bit more before rolling into the throttle and not jabbing the gas, trying to keep momentum. Almost like driving around a long curve on the road or, as I just recalled you saying, an exit or entrance ramp to the freeway.

Watching the videos of your steering inputs, your hand position looks really good. And you keep your hands on the wheel (also good). Again, it's tough to be 100% sure from a video, but I think you'll be able to speed up your hands as you get used to the improved steering response.

I can almost hear you saying 9 & 3 every run!

In that last slalom, you were off of the gas around the 2nd cone. I think you could have gotten on the gas at that 2nd cone and powered through the finish. Being early on the 1st cone would have allowed you to be faster in; getting on the throttle early would have made you faster through and out.

This always seems to escape me in the heat of the moment. I’ve been talking to other drivers and one of them sent me this:

AF0A3FD9-6768-48CE-857A-BA2113C468C0.jpeg

“Run over the base of the cone with your tire just like this and keep your throttle steady.”

He used to be a active member here but moved on to Corvettes.

@mikey94gt

CA0DE255-564E-4F8C-8D58-9A2FFF039C64.jpeg

You've got very good fundamentals and instincts. The next step is to build up your trust in them to attack longer sections of the course. Part of it is going faster into & through elements, but the harder thing to do is to link elements together to hold your speed for a longer amount of time. Accomplishing that requires a combination of identifying sections (not just individual elements) on your course walks and looking further ahead on your runs.

I'm looking forward to seeing videos from your next event!

This is exactly where I’m most anxious to improve. I know the car is capable and I’m trying to catch up to its abilities.

Thanks for the tips and I can’t wait to try again!
 
Joined
Apr 3, 2019
Messages
212
Reaction score
183
This always seems to escape me in the heat of the moment. I’ve been talking to other drivers and one of them sent me this:

“Run over the base of the cone with your tire just like this and keep your throttle steady.”
The "rear tire arc line" is also known as "backsiding" the cones. His explanation is accurate. Other people might refer to it as "putting the rear quarter panel 'on' the cone you're turning past." The goal is to give yourself as much distance between cones while running a smooth line (an "S" not a "Z"). That will enable you to be faster. In order to backside a cone, you need to initiate your turn ahead of the cone. If you wait until you're at the cone to initiate your turn, the car will carry past the cone and you'll have to make a slower/sharper steering input around the next cone. Being late (not properly backsiding) tends to cascade, making you later and later on subsequent cones. If you are late on the 1st slalom cone, you'll either hit the 3rd cone, or have to slow way down to make it.

If you haven't already watched it, check out my "How the WRONG LINE COSTS YOU TIME" video.

Everything opens up when you make early steering inputs. Many course designers create courses that punish drivers for being late entering elements, so there's a ton of time to be found by attacking the first cone in a section correctly.
 

Latest posts

Forum statistics

Threads
76,267
Messages
1,473,282
Members
14,151
Latest member
Mustangman45

Members online

No members online now.
Top