Wiring in aux led turn signal?

sleepn_sn95

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Alright so I have an idea involving a side led turn signal but have the slightest idea about wiring. Could I just splice it into the front turn signal wiring or would I need some resistors or something so it doesnt blink super fast? Any help is appreciated, thanks.
 

JeremyAlan

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Adding resistance via another light would cause it to blink slower and not faster, if I'm not mistaken. However, an LED wouldn't affect it enough to matter.

Splicing into the turn signal wiring would work just fine.

Jeremy
 

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Adding resistance via another light would cause it to blink slower and not faster, if I'm not mistaken. However, an LED wouldn't affect it enough to matter.

Splicing into the turn signal wiring would work just fine.

Jeremy

You are not mistaken sir.

Only thing id add is that you usually want to add some sort of resistor in series with the led (unless it has a built in one) because leds are so low draw that the almost create a short circuit on their own.



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ttocs

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You are not mistaken sir.

Only thing id add is that you usually want to add some sort of resistor in series with the led (unless it has a built in one) because leds are so low draw that the almost create a short circuit on their own.



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almost create a short? Not really correct technically I mean they traditionally draw low voltage and and current but never heard any electronic component being accused of looking like a short. It would all depend on if you wire them in series or parallel. If you wire them in series I don't think it would hurt much since the LED resistance(which is low) would just be added to the resistance of the other lights until one of them burned out and they both died. Now wiring the led in parallel off of an incandescent light could cause an issue as resistance would drop significantly

I would make a piece of plexi that is the exact same shape as the GT/cobra logo and mount the emblem on top of it. You will not see the plexi till its lit up and hen it will glow evenly all the way around the emblem.

I am doing something similar on my build I actually cut out the area where the GT logo went and I am going to be flush mounting a custom emblem(so its perfectly flat/even with the body). Its going to be mounted to a piece of plexi that will be backed with chrome so the chrome will show around the emblem, through the plexi. On the top of the plexi I am going to mount some leds that shine down so you will not see the actually light, just the light they put out into the plexi. I was going to do it mainly for night shows but as a turn signal it could be kinda cool
 

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almost create a short? Not really correct technically I mean they traditionally draw low voltage and and current but never heard any electronic component being accused of looking like a short. It would all depend on if you wire them in series or parallel. If you wire them in series I don't think it would hurt much since the LED resistance(which is low) would just be added to the resistance of the other lights until one of them burned out and they both died. Now wiring the led in parallel off of an incandescent light could cause an issue as resistance would drop significantly

Remember that an LED is not a traditional lamp. An LED is a diode, so it does not have a simple resistance. Try connecting an LED to a microcontroller without a resistor on your output channel; it will stop the circuit from working correctly because of the short. If it's in series with another load then no, you don't necessarily need a resistor. You just can't use an LED as a substitute for a load on a circuit.

Also, LEDs don't "draw low voltage", that statement doesn't really make sense.
 

ttocs

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I agree with everything you said, not sure if it was correcting me really. But curious why saying that diodes traditionally draw low voltage doesn't make sense?
 

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I agree with everything you said, not sure if it was correcting me really. But curious why saying that diodes traditionally draw low voltage doesn't make sense?

Cool I'm just trying to provide info, as LEDs are getting big I see people trying to use them like conventional lamps and not following best practices.

I mean that voltage is determined by the source, the draw is in amps. Maybe you meant they traditionally run on low voltage?


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