Permanent replacement for your hard plastic vacuum lines

Discussion in '96-04 - 2V Specific' started by Burninriverdiver, Feb 11, 2018.

  1. Burninriverdiver

    Burninriverdiver Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,359
    Likes Received:
    9
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2014
    Location:
    Akron OH
    Every time I need to work on the top end of my motor the hard plastic lines are in the way and need removed. After 22 years of heat exposure these things crack in a new place every time I breathe too hard. I got tired of patching them so I came up with a solution.

    You will need:

    1: Old cracked vacuum lines with the rubber connectors. I reused the rubber connectors since they were in good shape.

    2: Approximately 10 feet of 3/16 hard brake lines (I chose the nickel/copper for ease of bending and flaring... not to mention bling)

    3: Approximately 2 feet of 5/32 rubber hose (washer fluid line hose was what I used).

    4: Heat shrink wrap (3/16 inner diameter) for the ends of the plastic lines to ensure a tighter seal against the rubber hose.

    TOOLS

    4: Flaring tool to ensure a seal is created between the rubber and copper lines.

    5: Tubing cutter

    6: (Optional) tube bender. I bent mine by hand, it's easy with the nickel/ copper lines. I can't find my tube bender so I decided to bend by hand; the bender would help to make a cleaner install.

    Onto the action.

    1st: Remove the plastic lines from all the vacuum connections and pull it out in one piece if possible. After removal place the piece on a work bench for reference.

    [​IMG]

    2nd: Cut the dual connector that goes into the throttle body, leaving enough plastic hard line to slip your washer fluid hose over (1" will do).

    [​IMG]

    3rd: Measure the cut portions of the hard plastic lines that are going to be replaced with copper lines. Cut the copper lines to that length.

    4th: Flare the end of each new copper line so it makes a better seal with the rubber tubing that it will connect to.

    [​IMG]

    5th: Apply the heat shrink wrap over the exposed plastic hard lines that go into the factory rubber connector. The heat shrink wrap increases the outer diameter of the hard plastic line stubs and makes a better seal to the rubber washer fluid line. (Photo in the 2nd step shows my heat shrink wrap already in place to patch cracks from previous removal).

    6th: Slide rubber hose over copper line and then over the hard line stub that goes into the factory rubber connector.

    [​IMG]

    7th: Continue to measure and replace each hard plastic line with copper lines in the same manner while bending each to match the factory pathway. I apologize for not getting measurements or angles of each line, I may update in the future.

    [​IMG]

    8th: Put into place and fine tune the bends as needed. Copper lines are easier to make hairpin adjustments by hand than steel/ stainless.

    [​IMG]

    That's it. I have some valve seals to replace so I didn't bother installing fully because I'd have to remove it when my spring compressor comes in anyway.

    This thread is open to better installation techniques and suggestions. I haven't tested it out running yet but I have full confidence that it will work better than the cracked and dry rotted plastic hard lines that were on it.





    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  2. Burninriverdiver

    Burninriverdiver Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,359
    Likes Received:
    9
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2014
    Location:
    Akron OH
    I put this thread in the 2v section because that's what I have. The general idea can be applied to any vehicle as long as the line and hose diameters are appropriate.
     
  3. 96blak54

    96blak54 Legend

    Messages:
    6,170
    Likes Received:
    24
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2011
    Location:
    Ky
    Nice write up and great resource ideas!
     
  4. Burninriverdiver

    Burninriverdiver Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,359
    Likes Received:
    9
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2014
    Location:
    Akron OH
    Thanks [MENTION=14727]96blak54[/MENTION], I figured I've been on here long enough I should finally start a thread lol.
     
  5. OLD H2S

    OLD H2S Active Member SN95 Supporter

    Messages:
    775
    Likes Received:
    12
    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2015
    Location:
    Silver Spring Maryland
    Get rid of that little intake filter breather on the driver side valve cover and make a 3/8 inch tube running to after the MAF and plumb it in to the main intake before the TB and your tune and idle will run better.
    Nice work by the way, now I am thinking if I should do polished stainless lines but I'm not big on bling?
     
  6. Burninriverdiver

    Burninriverdiver Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,359
    Likes Received:
    9
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2014
    Location:
    Akron OH
    I had that hose running to the intake tubing and took it off for the breather to eliminate another hose for asthetic purposes only. The hose is going back if it'll help run better, it honestly looks cleaner than the breather anyway. Thanks for the advice!

    Stainless lnes are a great idea, there's nothing wrong with not wanting to deal with corrosion regardless of how shiner they look!
     
  7. ttocs

    ttocs Legend

    Messages:
    22,424
    Likes Received:
    668
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2009
    Location:
    Evansville Indiana
    its letting unmetered air into the system.
     
  8. OLD H2S

    OLD H2S Active Member SN95 Supporter

    Messages:
    775
    Likes Received:
    12
    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2015
    Location:
    Silver Spring Maryland
    I did the same thing. I was playing around with my Moroso oil catch can and tried all different hose sizes for oil scavenging and types of routing to the PCV valve. The 3/8 ID was the right amount of flow to the pistons and the oil catch can.
     
  9. 96blak54

    96blak54 Legend

    Messages:
    6,170
    Likes Received:
    24
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2011
    Location:
    Ky
    One would think the larger i.d. like a 3/8 hose, the vacuum would be less....making the pcv valve cover draw better. Sucking up residual oil bites!
     
  10. lwarrior1016

    lwarrior1016 Well-Known Member SN95 Supporter

    Messages:
    4,986
    Likes Received:
    21
    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2014
    Location:
    South Mississippi
    Man, Good job on those lines! I say ditch that silly egr valve and make those vacuum lines go away!


    The breather filter/functional pcv debate has been beat to death and I dont know which way to go on it.
     
  11. Burninriverdiver

    Burninriverdiver Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,359
    Likes Received:
    9
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2014
    Location:
    Akron OH
    I had a catch can but it didn't catch much oil since it didn't have a baffle or material inside of it, that's what sparked the idea to put a breather on the other side. I have some 3/8 hose in the garage that'll work perfectly so I'll take your advice and run it that way.

    Hopefully I don't draw up too much more oil in the intake! I'm pretty positive the valve stem seals are my main culprit though.

    Thanks man! I wish I could get rid of the EGR but I live in one of the 4 (out of 88) counties that require emissions checks in Ohio. I'll have to swap my cats back in every other year to pass the test but I think swapping the EGR system might be a bigger pain than it's worth here
     
  12. 96blak54

    96blak54 Legend

    Messages:
    6,170
    Likes Received:
    24
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2011
    Location:
    Ky
    Im using an air oil seperator for air compressed tools. Works great and i know when its full. Car doesnt run tops with sucking oil. It take the reservoir off and recycle the oil back in. However this one is a bit to small. Ill be grabbing a larger $30 one here soon. Ill take pics....do a little write up like my good friend burnin here did!
     
  13. Burninriverdiver

    Burninriverdiver Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,359
    Likes Received:
    9
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2014
    Location:
    Akron OH
    I have run across that idea and considered it, does yours have a built in baffle or did you put something in it for the oil to stick to and collect? I keep seeing people using steel wool in them to collect oil but my instincts tell me not to do that out of fear of fragments getting sucked into the cylinders
     
  14. SnakeBit!

    SnakeBit! Active Member

    Messages:
    679
    Likes Received:
    22
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2014
    Location:
    Florida
    I have used the same thing for years. the "gadget" is to keep water out of compressed air lines. it has a brass filter at the top that allows the oil to catch and then drip down. nice thing, unless most you buy, as he stated, is you can see how much is in there. I have made several of them for people and have never had any issue other than having to glue the valve shut at the bottom. all I have bought have leaked...tried it by putting water in it first and see if it holds. none of mine ever did not leak, they all did.. I just epoxy or superglue them in the closed position.


    [​IMG]
     
  15. Burninriverdiver

    Burninriverdiver Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,359
    Likes Received:
    9
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2014
    Location:
    Akron OH
    Thanks for the photo, the brass filter is what I was asking about. This would definitely work better than my hollow "catch can." If I can't modify my can to work probably I'll plan to pick one of these up
     
  16. 96laseredcobra

    96laseredcobra Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,387
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2015
    Location:
    Farmington MO
    works great for me. i painted mine black it was blue. 18 bucks total[​IMG][​IMG]

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
     
  17. Defiant

    Defiant Active Member

    Messages:
    501
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2017
    Location:
    CT
    A catch can is cheap, mine has a dipstick so I know when to empty it. Just get one with a nice baffle and a sharp U bend so the oil stays trapped in the bottom and can’t make it up through the tight radius.

    Also you’re not supposed to recycle that oil! When I empty my catch can it looks like a mocha milkshake, it’s full of fuel, dirty water, and nasty vapors. I couldn’t imagine dumping all that back into my engine!!! I dispose of that filth right away.
     
  18. 96blak54

    96blak54 Legend

    Messages:
    6,170
    Likes Received:
    24
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2011
    Location:
    Ky
    You make a good point about not recycling the oil for any engine of any worth. Mine however,....its about as junk as junk can get
     
  19. Burninriverdiver

    Burninriverdiver Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,359
    Likes Received:
    9
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2014
    Location:
    Akron OH
    You made me laugh, reminds me of when I worked at s lube shop in high school. We had a gallon jug that we let the funnels sit in to drip after we poured oil into cars, it was a mix of every brand and viscosity from rotella to hybrid 0w-20. Once the gallon jug was half full of the new oil drops (about once a week) id pour it into my 78 chevy c20 that leaked and burned oil anyway.
     
  20. Burninriverdiver

    Burninriverdiver Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,359
    Likes Received:
    9
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2014
    Location:
    Akron OH
    looks great man! If it works, it's cheaper and more effective than the catch can I bought previously. I'll probably do some research but I am leaning towards that setup since it doesn't take up much space.

    I'll check around, I wouldn't mind a nice looking can that actually works if I can find one for the right price. I don't think I'd dump the catch can oil back into this car but maybe if I'm desperate I'll dump it in my truck lol.