2020 SCCA CAM Class Rules Changes for 1994-2004 Mustangs

photoracer18

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Hmm this is interesting. I have a 2002 V-6 Mustang sitting in my yard currently un-driven in several years. I got it when my SCCA T-2 95 Cobra ran out of eligibility years, and they wanted me to continue as a member of the Showroom Stock and Touring Advisory Committee. So I built it as an SSB V-6 Mustang. My T-2 sponsor Steeda sent me a Diablo tuner from their V-6 expert to stick in the computer for 93 Octane. Man did that heat the catalytic converters up! I put factory 2001 Bullitt springs and shocks on it but what it really needed was a rear sway-bar. They approved the use of the the 7.5 Posi LS in the rear although you had to rebuild it every year. I can see that the IRS might be a big help although I seem to remember that one was kind of heavy. Not sure that would be better than an AS Watts linkage and torque arm. I spent a long time racing solid axle Mustangs on the track and autocrosses. I already have another car that can run Touring also (V6 is T-4 I think) but at my age autocross is likely all I plan to do and I like running the GT-350. Not sure what wheel and tire combo they will allow but I still have my set of 5 SSR Integral A2 17x9s that weigh only 16# each from the T-2 car.

Currently I auto-x my Shelby in the Capitol Driving Club instead of the SCCA here in the WashDC area due to the way they run the events. You don't have to sign up for the entire year and they use a handicap system to lump all the cars together with HP, tires, and weight factored in.
 

Patientzero

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CAM is basically unlimited except min weight and 200tw tires. I think you're going to want to go much bigger than a 9" wheel. Most people at the top end of the class are running 315 or 335's square.
Don't let that deter you from coming out though.
You will be in CAM-T with 3000lb minimum weight.
 

photoracer18

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I'm a Novice Coordinator for 2 local clubs. I instruct at every event and help run at least two Novice Schools every season. The most common misconceptions are that you need a heavily-modified car to even show up and you need autocross tires when you start out.

You will learn more about driving behind the wheel of an under-prepped car on street tires than you will ever learn in a fully-prepped CAM car. Good suspension makes up for driving mistakes; good tires cover up driving mistakes. The barrier to entry for autocross isn't (and should never be) having a race car. The whole point is that it's something just about anyone in any car can do on the weekend to learn how to be a better driver.

Seat time is the best mod you can make. I give my students this example: A K-member and coil-overs can cost about $1,000. That money would pay for 3 seasons of local events! That amount of seat time will get you faster than a K-member and coil-overs ever will.

I started on Nitto NT555 tires. I switched to NT05 tires in my 2nd season. Then went to BFG Rivals when I felt like I could actually use them to their potential. But, I once drove a student's bone-stock 1999 V6 Mustang to within 2 seconds of my time on Rivals. Yes, the car is important, but knowing what to do with it out on course is more important.
There is no substitute for competing in an under-powered car. You learn one of the key skill of driving and that is momentum driving. I started out road-racing (the second time) in a 1972 Mazda RX-2 rotary powered sedan. That is about as low in power as you can get and it does not handle like a Miata. I drove that car for 9 years in SCCA ITA before I switched to a 95 Cobra in Touring-2.
 
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Warhorse Racing

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Hmm this is interesting. I have a 2002 V-6 Mustang sitting in my yard currently un-driven in several years. I got it when my SCCA T-2 95 Cobra ran out of eligibility years, and they wanted me to continue as a member of the Showroom Stock and Touring Advisory Committee. So I built it as an SSB V-6 Mustang. My T-2 sponsor Steeda sent me a Diablo tuner from their V-6 expert to stick in the computer for 93 Octane. Man did that heat the catalytic converters up! I put factory 2001 Bullitt springs and shocks on it but what it really needed was a rear sway-bar. They approved the use of the the 7.5 Posi LS in the rear although you had to rebuild it every year. I can see that the IRS might be a big help although I seem to remember that one was kind of heavy. Not sure that would be better than an AS Watts linkage and torque arm. I spent a long time racing solid axle Mustangs on the track and autocrosses. I already have another car that can run Touring also (V6 is T-4 I think) but at my age autocross is likely all I plan to do and I like running the GT-350. Not sure what wheel and tire combo they will allow but I still have my set of 5 SSR Integral A2 17x9s that weigh only 16# each from the T-2 car.

Currently I auto-x my Shelby in the Capitol Driving Club instead of the SCCA here in the WashDC area due to the way they run the events. You don't have to sign up for the entire year and they use a handicap system to lump all the cars together with HP, tires, and weight factored in.
Ever since the IRS was put into the 99-04 Cobras, there has been a debate about whether or not it's better than a Solid Rear Axle with the common mods (Panhard Bar, Torque Arm, Watt's Link). In my experience, the IRS puts the limit further out than those other mods. If you run on courses with lots of sweepers and slaloms, a well-built IRS will be best. And, because it adds about 100 lbs. to the rear end of the car, it helps with the weight distribution. My V6 IRS car is nearly at 50/50 and it is much more nimble than my 2000 GT IRS car.

But, I run with many people who have fast, competitive SRA cars. I don't want to give the impression that you NEED an IRS to autocross. I loved running my SRA cars (and I'll be running one a few times in 2020).

As for rims, you are going to want as much rubber as possible on the car. My New Edge cars run a 315 square setup, and that really helps with grip. But, a lot of people I know run 275s on 18x10 rims.

You should absolutely run that V6 in CAM-T. I can't wait to see what mine can do when I get the weight out of it!
 

Patientzero

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It is my understanding from people that have done much more testing than me that all else being equal the SRA is better on a smooth track and the IRS is better on a rough track. There is a good article on Maximum Motorsport's website talking to a pro driver who drove them both back to back.

I still would like to try out an IRS someday either in my car or another SN95. All the cars I've ever driven competitively were IRS(Nissan 240sx), now I have the torque arm in my car.
 
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Warhorse Racing

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It is my understanding from people that have done much more testing than me that all else being equal the SRA is better on a smooth track and the IRS is better on a rough track. There is a good article on Maximum Motorsport's website talking to a pro driver who drove them both back to back.

I still would like to try out an IRS someday either in my car or another SN95. All the cars I've ever driven competitively were IRS(Nissan 240sx), now I have the torque arm in my car.
I ran SRA cars for a few seasons, on rough and smooth courses. As an instructor, I have driven several SRA cars with Panhard Bars and Torque Arms. In addition to the limit being further out with the IRS, the overall composure during changes of direction is better. The IRS does soak up the bumps better, but the fact that the car is more composed and more capable of holding grip through slaloms and sweepers means you can get on the throttle earlier in elements. Being able to increase your duration of acceleration means getting through the course faster. I've run at the same sites with SRA and IRS cars. In my experience, the IRS cars are faster. Having said that, a stock IRS isn't nearly as capable as a properly built IRS. And a modded SRA will outperform a stock IRS.
 

evilcw311

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It is my understanding from people that have done much more testing than me that all else being equal the SRA is better on a smooth track and the IRS is better on a rough track. There is a good article on Maximum Motorsport's website talking to a pro driver who drove them both back to back.

I still would like to try out an IRS someday either in my car or another SN95. All the cars I've ever driven competitively were IRS(Nissan 240sx), now I have the torque arm in my car.

A built sra with a watts and ta setup is superior to a stock irs but a built irs is hard to beat period.

You’ll learn there’s a few mm fan boys on here but most of us take what they have to say with a grain of salt. Plenty of drivers have competed very well and on a high level without a single piece of their way overpriced equipment.

Plus on this site it’s a requirement that everyone takes a shot when mm is mentioned.

So drink up everyone.


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