How did you guys get good with wrenching on mustangs

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Twista, Mar 20, 2014.

  1. Twista

    Twista Legend

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    I mean tearing down engines and pulling entire engine out the car. Putting in new clutches... changing rockers and pistons. All that crap.

    I wanna learn how to do this but i have a feeling most people worked along side of another experienced person like a father who taught them things.


    Did you learn on your own? Last time i attempted to do any major work on my 1997 GT. I swapped the non PI intake out for a PI intake. That ended in disaster when the car caught on fire due to the fuel line in the engine bay not being fully secured. :( Shitty way to loose your 1st mustang when you was trying to learn and work on it by yourself.

    I just cant get the courage to do any major stuff anymore.
     
  2. joekd

    joekd Well-Known Member

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    Not to sound like an ass but my dad didn't teach me a damn thing, I learned how to do stuff because I couldn't afford to have anyone else do it

    That plus a high mechanical intellect (tested and proven) are a dangerous combo
     
  3. Wichers123

    Wichers123 Well-Known Member

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    Also doing it for a living kinda helps too. I read ALOT and I mean a lot.
     
  4. slow90coupe

    slow90coupe Well-Known Member

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    I taught myself, I just read a TON of how-to's and write-ups on the internet, went out there, and tried it. Whenever I had a problem, I would google it or post up on a forum. I always figured out my problem through the internet. It's the best tool you can have IMO.
     
  5. whiplash473

    whiplash473 Moderator Staff SN95 Supporter

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    Internal engine is pretty serious. Tolerances and whatnot are critical to engine performance. There's a million people out there that have or say they have torn engines down, thrown them back together but just like most things it doesn't mean it was done right.

    That being said, I've spent my entire childhood with my old man working on vehicles. The fact that we had a lot of toys didn't hurt either. Snowmobiles, mini bikes, cars, outboard motors, ATC's, everything.

    I've spent many nights reading through service manuals of various vehicles and have learned a lot that way as well.

    You know that kid in shop class that seemed too young to know all he knew? That was me, escept I'm not the type to flaunt my skills. Basically - get a service manual and study it till the pages are burning. They're a phenominal tool and are there to help, without trying to sound like they know what they're talking about like many people find out via YouTube videos.

    Sent from bored/stroked HTC One
     
  6. 96blak54

    96blak54 Legend

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    I cant stand to not know how to do something im interested in. I have to give it my dad for feeding my habits. He bought me a car lift, tire balancer/changer, tools and cars to mess up on, but ive always been one to take charge with learning all I can.
     
  7. chaos254

    chaos254 New Member

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    My dad taught me the basics and the harder stuff I learned from the internet and wrenching.

    Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
     
  8. DeepList

    DeepList Administrator Admin SN95 Supporter

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    My dad was/is pretty much worthless, for lack of a better term. He didn't teach me much of anything... at all. I bought my first vehicle when I was 15 and I was wrenching around on it before I even had my driver's license. I've never had any repairs done at a shop on any vehicle that I've ever owned unless it requires special machinery or tools that I don't have or can't obtain. I do my own work mainly because I'm a tight wad and I just can't justify paying somebody else to do something that I can do myself. Now granted, it may take me 4 or 5 times longer to do the same thing that somebody can have done in a fraction of the time, but that's okay. If there's something that I need to do that I don't understand, or have the knowledge to do, I will research it first and then tackle it. I make it a point to buy a service/maintenance manual for each vehicle that I have too. I'm not afraid to ask questions either. If I am about to do something and I don't know about it, I'll make it a point to inquire with people who have more knowledge. Auto forums, such as this one, are great for that purpose.
     
  9. RichV

    RichV Well-Known Member

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    My old man got me started, I remember being in the garage with him helping. But nothing extremely involved until I got my 1st car, it had a thrown rod. So he helped me do the work.

    Other than that, I've done EVERYTHING on the Mustangs on my own.

    I wouldn't let a mistake deter you, that's how you learn. I bet when you work on the fuel system now, you definitely double check everything. I've learned plenty of lessons by ****ing it up 1st.
     
  10. kb1982

    kb1982 Active Member

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    Having the right tools for the job makes wrenching alot easier. When you dont have the right tools, thats when you gotta get creative. I grew up as the only male in the house with 3 females, and we didnt have alot of means, so I became an electrican, mechanic, and a plumber. The best way is start with small projects and always double and triple check your work. If something nags at you, recheck it. Not to long ago, I installed a new locker in my rear diff, and recieved a phone call during it. After I had it all bolted together and filled with oil, I had this thought running through my head "Did I torque down the carrier caps?" Safe to say, it all came apart again. Staying organized helps alot on big projects also. Put each bolt back in its respective hole or in the hole of the part it came off of.
     
  11. Suspect

    Suspect Well-Known Member

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    i learned on my own. mostly because $$, but then i saw that i liked it. i wanted to take shhht apart and just put it back together. once i got a mustang and a daily i knew id get all in the mustang. like others its reading, internet, and just plain getting in there and getting dirty.

    once i did this..

    [​IMG]


    i wasnt scared to do anything else.
     
  12. 96blak54

    96blak54 Legend

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    Good info here
     
  13. Ferocious

    Ferocious Legend SN95 Supporter

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    I just youtube everything.
     
  14. Burninriverdiver

    Burninriverdiver Well-Known Member

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    Gotta learn the basics, I worked in a lube shop pit and just looked at each car I pulled the plug on and did the filter change etc. after a while it just clicks. Working for snap on tools helped too, it made me realize that anything is relatively easy with the right tool.
     
  15. Leo 5.0

    Leo 5.0 Active Member

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    personally, being broke.
    I never really had much of a helping hand, which is why I joined here.

    But when I started, out, I started small, became good at what little things I did, and from there got a little more brave to tackle bigger tasks.

    That an a chilton or haynes.

    Mostly, trial and error.

    But regardless of the skinned knuckles, or unexpected trips to grab a single wrench..
    When it's done and it's right, there is that warm and fuzzy you get.
    Which will drive you to see just how far you can go.

    Well that's my take based on my own experience.
     
  16. Leo 5.0

    Leo 5.0 Active Member

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    Exactly.
    I used to think mechanics were great people. (no disrespect to any)

    Then I realized holy cow, I just did the same thing, and didn't have to wait on the shop or pay!
     
  17. CC'S95GT

    CC'S95GT Legend

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    Like others, my Dad didn't help a whole lot either. 1st he's a body man and not a mechanic. 2nd Mom and Dad got divorced when I was 14.
    I learned a little bit in shop class in HS.
    Enter the military.The Navy trained me to work on turbine engines, and since they're located in the engine room (not an airplane) I also learned about pneumatics, hydraulics, electronics, plumbing, pumps, valves, bla bla bla.
    Leave the military and back to school to get my federal license to work airplanes and their engines. Similar to military training but now I make much more.
    Car repair funds were always at a minimum and because I was raising 3 boys so I fixed most everything my self.
    I have a Haynes or Chilton manual for every car I have ever owned as an adult. Car forums help too. I don't neglect car maintenance, "you can pay me know or you can pay me later"
     
  18. sleepn_sn95

    sleepn_sn95 Well-Known Member

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    My theory has always been just take something apart and sooner or later you or going to have to figure out how to put it back together, or your screwed
     
  19. ElKabong197

    ElKabong197 New Member

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    Lots and lots of reading and google.

    Biggest thing, is take your time. Dont be afraid to just walk away for 20 minutes when something doesnt go right. Dont try to tackle a new project on a time limit either.

    Sent from my Galaxy S-fizzledizzle
     
  20. D3VST8R96GT

    D3VST8R96GT Well-Known Member

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    Be too poor/cheap to pay someone to do it.

    The D3V