Casper the Cobra - Procharged 96' Cobra

ttocs

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ask your car buddies if they have a solder gun and someone should have one. They get a little hotter and are better for thicker wires.
 

lwarrior1016

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Honestly, it’s easiest to solder those size wires with a mini torch. You might run in to a problem with that wire being old. Sometimes they don’t like to take solder.
 

Venompower

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Honestly, it’s easiest to solder those size wires with a mini torch. You might run in to a problem with that wire being old. Sometimes they don’t like to take solder.

Like a mini-butane torch? I bought flux paste yesterday to help promote adhesion.
 

joemomma

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Can't you just replace the fusible links with regular wire and an inline fuse?
 

lwarrior1016

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Yes, the mini butane torches that come in soldering kits.

you might be best off getting some good 4ga wire and 8ga wire and making your own fusible link.

I do not have a fusible link on my car, it’s a 4ga solid wire from the fuse box to the alternator.
 

Venompower

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Yes, the mini butane torches that come in soldering kits.

you might be best off getting some good 4ga wire and 8ga wire and making your own fusible link.

I do not have a fusible link on my car, it’s a 4ga solid wire from the fuse box to the alternator.

I ordered some 12 gauge fusible link off Amazon arrives tomorrow. I’m just going to do my best to solder it together tomorrow night and get everything out back together to see where I’m at… I can’t understand why the fuses in the engine bay fuse box tested good for continuity but are only getting 7.6v when the battery shows 12.6v.

I figured start at battery and work my way back to the interior? I also noticed the white / pink wire to the starter was not connected which I now believe is for the starter… alarm must have ran the starter though itself?
 

ttocs

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testing for continuity just means your testing if the fuse is still good and there is a connection that continues through them. More than likely if you fix this it will fix your other electrical problems. 7.6v is right below the threshold of almost kind of sorta working and just enough to give 12v electronics fits.
 

Venompower

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testing for continuity just means your testing if the fuse is still good and there is a connection that continues through them. More than likely if you fix this it will fix your other electrical problems. 7.6v is right below the threshold of almost kind of sorta working and just enough to give 12v electronics fits.
What I meant was the fuse itself isn’t the cause, like the initial issue the blown fuse caused a voltage drop to certain fuses in the interior fuse box. In this case the fuses in the engine bay have continuity meaning the cause of the low voltage should theoretically be the wires between the battery and the fuse box.
 

Venompower

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I’m back up and running! Thanks for the suggestions and support. I think the negative terminal was the power issue, and obviously with the alarm cutting the starter wire the car wasn’t going to start. Micro Butane torch saved my sanity with soldering and it’s all wrapped up now!

16-A1-BA52-4896-4-BCC-B7-E3-59-D851-A3-C9-FA.jpg
 

Venompower

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Any thoughts on this… noticed while searching for wiring. Admittedly for all the modifications I’ve done to a wide range of vehicles, I have never modified suspension.

0-FD8-D258-A37-B-4275-9-A78-8-FC052-C0958-B.jpg


If you bounce the back you can see movement up to the bottom of the nut.
 

weendoggy

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My thought is: 1. someone forgot the lower bushing at the top of the shaft (or it's gone), 2. someone put the wrong shocks on, or the nut isn't tight (although it looks like it is), so, I'd do some research on what's on and what's suppose to be on.
 

joemomma

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How much movement are we talking about? From what I remember when I did my rears, that doesn't quite look tight enough. I seem to remember that when I did mine, the black rubber bushing or whatever was squeezing out a little from under the big washer/cap.
 

Venompower

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How much movement are we talking about? From what I remember when I did my rears, that doesn't quite look tight enough. I seem to remember that when I did mine, the black rubber bushing or whatever was squeezing out a little from under the big washer/cap.
Maybe .5-1” I agree from looking at pictures it appears loose, trying to figure out how to hold the shaft in place so I can tighten the nut down without it spinning.
 

Boostr1

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You should be able to put a wrench on the the top to keep the shaft from spinning while you're tightening the nut, unless its round them use vice grips.
 

Venompower

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You should be able to put a wrench on the the top to keep the shaft from spinning while you're tightening the nut, unless its round them use vice grips.
Tried needle nose pliers when I first found it and it spun in them. I'll try vice grips...
 

weendoggy

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Before you try to tighten it, take the nut off to make sure you have threads to tighten. If you don't and continue to try and tighten it, you may find there isn't any more threads. Why not take it off completely, and/or, check for a part number to be sure they're correct? Might save some headaches.
 

joe65

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E266BDCC-F157-4751-80E8-AC56B7DEB89A.jpeg
Before you try to tighten it, take the nut off to make sure you have threads to tighten. If you don't and continue to try and tighten it, you may find there isn't any more threads. Why not take it off completely, and/or, check for a part number to be sure they're correct? Might save some headaches.

agreed. Does the other side look the same? Should just be the rubber grommet a washer and the nut. I usually am able to get a smaller box wrench on the top and then tighten the nut as mentioned but have used vise grips also.
Should look like this.
 
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