The Coyote swap and the SN95

white95

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@joe65 I've decided to make this a thread so that others can add their input for everyone’s benefit.

To answer your question, I don’t actually have an installed Coyote swap. What I do have is most all of the parts required to do so and a lot of usable knowledge.

We have since installed and ran my Coyote swap. :cool:

I have since BROKEN and yanked the Coyote out. ‍:mad:

We have since installed Coyote engine 1.01 :D


You have to decide a path:

1) Standalone or FRPP control pack

  • FRPP control pack - $1000-1500+ Literally plug and play. If you follow the directions, it will start on the fire try and run as Ford intended. You have to buy a pedal mount to use the drive by wire throttle stuff. I’ll have to check but I believe this is meant to run Mustang engines so you’ll have to swap cams. Expect that to run about $160 per cam and $170 per cam phaser. You’ll also have to replace all 32 cam journal bolts. I suggest ARP since the stock stuff is TTY.
  • Standalone EFI - Could be cheaper or could be vastly more expensive. Much more involved installation. You can set this up as drive by wire or traditional cable driven throttle body. The sky is the limit for tuning options. The Holley TiVCT controller makes life really easy. That being said, you can lock the cams out and do whatever you want but you deny yourself the pleasure of the variable cam timing which helps the Coyote shine. Speaking of throttle bodies, a solid choice is the 87mm FAST 54087. This uses a GM style TPS but more importantly has an stepper style IAC for an easy install.
Everything else is pretty much straightforward. You either run the Power by Hour accessory bracket setup or you don’t. Personally, I’m going to run a Volvo electric power steering pump with my custom braided hose PS setup and only run my AC compressor and the alternator.

@lwarrior1016 can shed some more light on how he ran his fuel system but from what I remember it’s a dead head fuel rail setup with the return line leaving the fuel pressure regulator.

You have to buy Coyote swap headers and either buy a matching mid-pipe or build one. Period.

You can reuse the stock engine mounts or utilize any other 4.6 aftermarket set.

You will have to either notch the stock oil pan or buy an aftermarket piece. My suggestion is the Moroso 20576 because it was revamped to fit swap headers. Fits the MM k-member like a glove.

Edit: Holley has releases a swap oil pan that works with stock k-members. Part #302-50

You can run T45’s or TR3650’s but they won’t last. Some don’t last a block others last thousands of miles. They weren’t meant for 7k+ rpm shifts as delivered from Ford. You can obviously beef them up to handle more power.

You will have to adapt the coolant hoses to the SN95 heater core and radiator. A lot simpler than it sounds. You can either elect to plumb the system with the degas style system or utilize the PBH coolant nipple kit and run the 94-95 style radiator.

There is an infinite number of ways to do this and we will help you get there.

Darren Slone from a Coyote swap group said:
I wanted to share some information on doing a coyote swap since it is asked so much in here on where to start or what parts are needed, etc.

●1st you need to decide what your budget is. That will tell you if you should use a 1st, 2nd, or 3rd gen f150 or mustang motor. I would recommend searching LKQ on Ebay which is where I bought mine. 1st gen f150 motors with less than 50k miles are around $2000 shipped. 2nd gen f150s around 50k are being shipped for $2700. 1st gen mustang motors are being shipped for $3500 and 2nd gen around $4500. 3rd gen are about $6500.

●2nd you need to decide on a transmission. You can run about any modular trans. 3650, t45, t56, etc. Mt82 shifter wont line up unless the linkages are shortened. 6r80s and other autos have been used also. I chose the cobra t56 that was already installed when I bought my car.

●3rd you need to put together a parts list and find them online. Late Model Restoration has a great coyote swap parts list. Plus they featured my blue mach 1 I swapped myself and sent me a free tshirt .

●Parts list: coyote swap headers and mid pipe, new gas pedal bracket, control pack, return fuel system, pulley brackets to run ac and power steering (Volvo electric ps pump can be used to keep the alternator and ac compressor in the stock coyote locations), 8 bolt flywheel and clutch, 4.6 starter, 4.6 motor mounts, 4.6 ps pump, coolant reservoir, battery relocation. Maybe more? This write up is being typed off the top of my head. I'm liable to forget some things.

●What's involved?

•A tubular k member is ideal but if you're on a budget you can use the stock k member with 3/8" motor mount spacers and a small dent in the corner of the stock oil pan.

•Gt exhaust manifolds can be used but it's a PIA! Not recommended because I done this because they were free. The passenger side gt manifold needs to hug the engine about a 1/2" tighter or more. I cut it in 3 places and welded it back. Flanges must be cut off and made new, mid pipe will need to be modified to attach.

•There are return fuel systems available but I made my own. Involving 20' of -8an braided ptfe feed line and -6an return (DO NOT use Ebay brand or a non brand or non ptfe hose! Idc what Ebay claims to hold 1500psi. They will bust!) I used Aeromotive fuel pressure regulator with a vacuum hose running to the intake manifold by the throttle body set at 60psi idle. AN fittings from summit racing and AN bulkhead fitting on the stock gas tank lid (also a PIA and not recommended). $400 was involved here. I used the ford gt pump that was already in the car.

•The ford racing control pack is most commonly used for the swaps because of its simplicity, reliability, and NOT for the price of ~$1500. There are other ways using a mustang or f150 wiring harness with PATS deleted but I am not experienced with that area. The control pack comes with your gas pedal, rad hoses, mustang air intake, computer, pcm, etc. It works well with the stock new edge ECU to run your factory stuff. There is a write up on wiring in the factory gauges. This is not something that is plug and play. The fuel pump also needs wired into the control pack along with the starter.

•The coyote powered f150 and mustangs all have electric steering racks. Therefore you will need a way to run power steering. I chose to put the ps pump in the ac compressor location using a swap bracket. I did not run ac, NOT recommended unless you live in Canada. Bracket kits can be bought for simplicity and reliability that add the ps pump to the front cover. I believe a mustang cover is needed for this. I used the f150 cover with mustang alternator that had to be grinded on to lign up the belt (If it works it works ‍♂️). Also a Volvo electric power steering pump can be used and that way the coyote ac compressor and alternator can be left in OEM positions. The Volvo pump is bulky and ugly but it will save you money and you can mount it in the fender area or radiator area.

• The coyote cold air intake comes around to the driver side where your factory battery is. I have seen a custom intake coming from the passenger side. I chose to run a lightweight odyssey 14lb battery and mounted it on the passenger side. Or you can put a battery in the trunk. The stock coolant reservoir will hit the intake. A smaller resorvoir can be used or relocated. Power steering lines will need to be made longer. Heater core hoses will need customized (simple). The control pack coyote pcm will need to be mounted. I put mine in the fender. The new wiring harness will need to be routed through the firewall. The control pack has directions.

•2nd gen f150s need mustang cams to run with the control pack since the f150 has a different firing order. 1st gen f150 cams do not need changed but the intake cams are different. The mustang intake cams can be swapped in for ~38hp. The f150 intake manifold is different, front timing cover, oil pan, exhaust manifolds are different and the 1st and 2nd gen have 10.5:1 cr instead of 11:1 like the mustang. 3rd gens are all 12:1.

•The factory oil coolers will not clear the front sway bar or work with the included rad hoses. Unscrew the cooler, insert adapter fitting and screw on oil filter.
1st gen f150 swaps can be done for around $6000 if you do it yourself. Always shoot for $1000 less than your budget for miscellaneous parts. 2nd gen mustang coyote swaps will get you closer to $9000 for a basic swap. Brand choices, k members, bracket kits, boost, return fuel kits, motors, trans, all vary in prices.
I'm sure I'm missing a lot and forgot some things but that's all I can think of for now. Good Luck!

PS: I will swap your car starting at $2500 for labor only for basic n/a swaps. Boost, wire tucks, etc. will make that price go up!

-Darren Slone
 
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white95

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We will update the first post with relevant information as we recall it or it’s brought to our attention.
 

lwarrior1016

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Good thread! We have forgotten timing covers, I know on the gen 1 engines the timing cover is different between the truck and mustang. I believe gen 2 is the same. This changes the alternator location.

Also, to run a sway bar, you’ll have to do a remote oil filter.

If you pull the oil pan, go ahead and install a mustang windage tray. Also a good time to install a mustang oil pump. The gears are thicker. I don’t know if the gen 2 has oil squirters for the pistons, but if it does this is a good time to delete them.

My fuel system is just like Josef said, stock steel lines to a braided line into the regulator, then to the stock coyote rail. I am in the process of changing that right now though.

Oh, and some super secret info about headers! 2v 4.6 headers have the same tube spacing as the coyote. I took a set of 2v long tubes and welded coyote flanges on them so they would bolt to the head. I’ve got a few thousand miles on them and they work fine.

Coolant system, I did my best to use stock coyote hoses or hoses that are readily available should I be out somewhere and something happen. I put the degas bottle kind of in the stock coyote location and used stock coyote hoses for that and the upper radiator hose. The lower radiator hose is from a 6cyl Jeep Cherokee. I’ll have to get the part number. The heater core hoses are coyote hoses but the driver side had to be modified, I’ve got that info in my thread.

You HAVE to get the pbh a/c brackets to mount the 4.6 compressor to the coyote otherwise the belt will keep coming off. I learned that the hard way. All the 2v a/c lines work though.

Ok, I’m done. That’s enough for this post.
F194F203-707E-4D42-A3F4-ACEC0AE2F01A.jpeg C81DAED1-E878-4912-ACA7-38BBB5EB598C.jpeg
 
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joe65

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You dudes are the shiz. Thanks for the info. I actually ended up with a gen 2 mustang motor. I was considering the f150 motor also because of cost but this motor I just got totally lucky in finding it.
 
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360dartgts

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A not complete list of what it is...

5.0 Coyote with billet oil pump gears and crank gear. out of 2017 F150
PBH F150 engine harness
SFI Dampner
To be tuned by Lund Racing
6R80 Trani
PBH accessory set and 6R80 linkage brackets
2.3 VMP Supercharger, intercooler, etc.
Champion 3 core radiator
Full Hooker Blackheart exhaust, crossmember, etc.
Driveshaft specialists aluminum driveshaft
3.73 8.8 Rear with Torsen differential, girdle, 31 spline Strange axles
Nitto R555 rear tires
Cobra Front brakes
UPR K-Member, Lower control arms, Bump seer kit, CC Plates, and coil overs with Koni shocks
Dakota Digital Dash (just came out)

Other stuff I'm sure I forgot...
 

joe65

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20200502_161732.jpg 20200502_161723.jpg
where I'm currently at.... getting there!View attachment 3946

i'm jealous. keep posting everything you can. i'm working up my project now. Got mine on a stand in the garage.

also for reference, I've been watching this swap thread on youtube. Really a pretty good watch because he actually shares what parts and issues they have doing the swap in a sn95. Sold me on not even trying to keep the stock k member.
 
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MyBoxersSayJoe

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Just want to say this is awesome. Great to see what you're doing with our gen and new tech.
 

360dartgts

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it all takes time Joe65. Any questions and post and I'll try to help.

updated pics
 

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joe65

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looks good. what year is your car? looks a lot like mine.
 

joe65

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So some of the videos and articles ive been reading mention this type of set up for the coyote swap. Seems a lot more affordable that a whole new return fuel system. Anyone have comments? I'm not saying this is the regulator/filter i'd use but this system would be my choice. So, this along with a 96-98 Mustang return hat for the pump. So somewhere in the area of $400 total for this kind of set up.

upload_2020-5-5_16-54-1.png
 

lwarrior1016

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For your car it would have to be 98 only. 79 (I think) to 97 had a return system but it was completely different from 98.
 

MyBoxersSayJoe

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For your car it would have to be 98 only. 79 (I think) to 97 had a return system but it was completely different from 98.
I think it was video part 3 or 4 of their swap they explain what years didn't have a return fuel system. If I remember correctly, 96-98 was okay. 99-04 needed to convert. 98 was definitely okay.
 

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